2 Comments

  1. 1

    Liz

    I took a Childrens’ Literature class in Graduate School and we discussed the concept that all of the characters in the story with the exception of Alice represent the adults in a child’s world. They are depicted as scary, and confusing: the madhatter and others at the tea party, the terrifying queen who was so rigid that if people did not do as told…”off with their heads, the two faced Cheshire Cat, the absent father like the rabbit who didn’t even call Alice by her name, but called her Mary. The whole changes in her size were like adults telling children, “Grow up” or “act your age” or “you’re too small to do that ” . There are many more, but I will leave them up to you to think of.

  2. 2

    Michael Heyman

    The intent of this article seems admirable (to dispel the ridiculous myths), but it’s clouded in distortions of fact and history (in NewHistorian, no less! Such a shame). Even a little research would go a long way. See Morton Cohen’s biography of Carroll for the facts and some interesting analysis, or the new Edward Wakeling biography.

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About the author

Daryl Worthington

Daryl Worthington

Daryl has a Bachelor’s degree in History from Royal Holloway University of London. He has always had a strong interest in writing, particularly about history, politics, the environment or culture. Originally from London, he currently lives in Riga, Latvia. Alongside history he has a strong interest in environmental and political issues. He enjoys travelling, slowly learning how to speak Latvian and exploring the country’s distinct culture. His other passion is music. He has worked as a writer on the subject, as well as being a musician himself. Daryl is interested in cultural, social and political history. He is fascinated by the role of cultural objects, whether novels, visual arts, events, music or even a past society’s reading of history, as means to reflect on times and people. His particular period of interest is modern history and he is keenly interested in the relationship between mainstream and counter cultures.

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