3 Comments

  1. 1

    History man

    It is not Turkey at the time. It was Armenia.

  2. 2

    History man

    Another point I disagree with, it is well established that Turks did not enter the Near East until the battle of manzikert (1050 AD). How does the author reconcile this? He claims that Askhanazazi Jews (AJs) closer to Turks, Kurds, and Iranians, but based on his findings AJs are closer to his Khazari population proxy … That includes Georgians and Armenians. Most likely author is cherry picking. Most likely based on his data AJs are more closely related to Armenians then they moved north as incidentally the Armenian feudal governing structure collapsed as a result of Arab and Turkish expansion.

  3. 3

    Rachel Hug

    Very interesting!

Comments are closed.

About the author

David DeMar

David DeMar

David has a Master of Arts in English Literature from the State University of New York at New Paltz, where he specialized in the Anglo-Saxon period prior to the Norman invasion of 1066. A professional freelance writer and fiction author, he currently lives in the Adirondack State Park with his wife and daughter. David's favorite historical period is 10th century England.

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